Calauit Safari Park

Calauit Safari Park

A home to Kenya’s wildlife

Text by GELYKA RUTH R. DUMARAOS
Photos by RAMIR G. CAMBIADO

THERE IS MORE TO BUSUANGA Island in Palawan than the island-rich town of Coron. When one’s finished with beach bumming and trekking on stunning rock formations, a perfect way to get closer to nature is by spending a morning in the wild.

Park Manager Froilan Patero Sariego

It is nothing sort of what we usually see in zoos where lonely animals are chained and confined in cages. In here, you see them up close—a couple of meters away, of course (you don’t want to get kicked and crush your bones), feed them with grasses, and observe how they enjoy roaming free.

A SLICE OF AFRICA

In 1976, the Kenyan government called help to conserve their part of wildlife during their civil war through the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Then President Ferdinand E. Marcos initiated to adopt the animals—consisting of giraffe, zebras, gazelle, and antelopes—and transfer them to the Calauit Game Preserve and Wildlife Sanctuary. Later on, the sanctuary was renamed to Caluit Safari Park

Today, it houses 25 giraffes, 36 zebras, nine bush backs, Elan, waterbucks, fresh water crocodiles, phytons, civets, and more. Hundreds of endemic Calamian deer which can only found in the Calamian Group of Islands can also be seen around the safari park.

Caluit Safari Park is raising African animal and Palawan endemic wildlife species as it continues to preserve the entire sanctuary including coastal and marine resources. It also eyes to be developed as an education and conservation center in Asia and as tourist destination. TP

Zebras occasionally form into small groups while grazing in the fields

Giraffes roam around the park along with zebras and Calamian deers.